THE "UNTASTED NECTOR" OF MUTED ECOLOGY: AN ECOFEMINIST ANALYSIS OF TROILUS AND CRESSIDA

THE "UNTASTED NECTOR" OF MUTED ECOLOGY: AN ECOFEMINIST ANALYSIS OF TROILUS AND CRESSIDA

  • Samaira Zulfiqar SED, Pindi Bhattian, Hafizabd
Keywords: 1.deep ecology 2.muted ecology 3.untasted Nector

Abstract

1: Abstract

The great master Shakespeare remains an over-researched fellow in the postmodern discursive revolution. He is revisited for Marxism, structuralism, feminism, postmodernism. The great classic Shakespeare offers endless capacity for discursive underpinning. But the present research focuses on exploring the character traits of Cressida that peeps into the dark recesses of her consciousness, and I take this epistemological depth as "deep ecology" that comes to life with the collaboration of a very inclusive framework of ecological criticism. The excessive critical works on female characters of Shakespeare's start in the 20th century, with the Modern lady Macbeth as Hedda Gabler, Anne Shirley as Anne of Green Gables (1908) appears analogous to Desdemona of Othello and of Romeo and Juliet in defying their fathers and going against the sanctity of popular mores of society. Since Eco criticism is a relational point that absorbs in its theoretical framework countless diversions, it is much more than a theory by employing this critical ecofeminism framework by Susan Buckingham. (Gender and Environment 2000) as a stance of exploring the unexplored areas of the female character of Cressida, I have named it "muted ecology" (Buckingham ). The research is conducted by employing the textual details contributory to developing the Character of Cressida, the plot, and the sub-plot. The term "untasted Nector" is borrowed from the speech of Troilus.

 

Author Biography

Samaira Zulfiqar, SED, Pindi Bhattian, Hafizabd

Samaira Zulfiqar Ali

Working in Punjab School Education Department

Pindi Bhattian Hafizabad.

References

References:
1: BUCKINGHAM, SUSAN. GENDER AND ENVIRONMENT. ROUTLEDGE, 2020.
2: Montgomery, L. M. Anne of Green Gables. Aladdin, 2014.
3: Chisholm, D. “The Art of Ecological Thinking: Literary Ecology.” Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment, vol. 18, no. 3, 2011, pp. 569–593., doi:10.1093/isle/isr077.
4: Greene, Gayle, et al. “Patriarchal Structures in Shakespeare's Drama.” Shakespeare Quarterly, vol. 37, no. 1, 1986, p. 128., doi:10.2307/2870206.
5: Morgenroth, Thekla, and Michelle K. Ryan. “Gender Trouble in Social Psychology: How Can
Butler’s Work Inform Experimental Social Psychologists’ Conceptualization of Gender?” Frontiers in Psychology, vol. 9, 2018, doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2018.01320.
6: Greenfield, Matthew. “Fragments of Nationalism in Troilus and Cressida.” Shakespeare’S Problem Plays, 2005, pp. 199–222., doi:10.1007/978-1-137-20890-3_11.
7: Vaughan, Virginia Mason. “Daughters of the Game: Troilus and Cressida and the Sexual Discourse of 16th-Century England.” Women's Studies International Forum, vol. 13, no. 3, 1990, pp. 209–220., doi:10.1016/0277-5395(90)90006-j.
8: O'Rourke, James, and Barbara E. Bowen. “Gender in the Theater of War: Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida.” Shakespeare Quarterly, vol. 47, no. 1, 1996, p. 89., doi:10.2307/2871065.
9: Dunmore, Simon. “Troílus and Cressída.” More Alternative Shakespeare Auditions for Women, 2018, pp. 98–99., doi:10.4324/9781315059747-43.
10: Gregory.Leonard. “Assuming Gender in Hamlet and Troilus and Cressida: ʻAre We to Assume That There Were Women in the Audience.” Multicultural Shakespeare, vol. 11, no. 26, 2014, doi:10.2478/mopa-2014-0006.
11: Clark, Timothy. The Cambridge Introduction to Literature and the Environment. Cambridge:
Cambridge UP, 2011. 111-119. Print.
12: Martin, Randall. “Shakespeare and Ecology: Definitions and Introduc- tion.” UNB. Fredericton. 8 Sept. 2011. Lecture.
13: Rosenfield, Kirstie Gulick. “Nursing Nothing: Witchcraft and Female Sex- uality in The Winter's Tale.” Mosaic 35.1 (2002). N. pag. Literature Online. Web. 12 Dec. 2011.
14: Sandilands, Catriona. The Good-Natured Feminist: Ecofeminism and the Quest for Democracy. Minneapolis: U of Minnesota P, 1999. UNB Libraries. Web. 11 Dec. 2011. 15: Shakespeare, William. Anthony and Cleopatra. Ed. Michael Neill. Oxford: Oxford UP,
2008. Print. Oxford World’s Classics.
16: Cymbeline. Ed. J. M. Nosworthy. Cambridge: Harvard UP, 1964. Print. The Arden Shakespeare.
17: Hamlet. Ed. G.R. Hibbard. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2008. Print. Oxford World’s Classics.















References:

1: BUCKINGHAM, SUSAN. GENDER AND ENVIRONMENT. ROUTLEDGE, 2020.
2: Montgomery, L. M. Anne of Green Gables. Aladdin, 2014.
3: Chisholm, D. “The Art of Ecological Thinking: Literary Ecology.” Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment, vol. 18, no. 3, 2011, pp. 569–593., doi:10.1093/isle/isr077.
4: Greene, Gayle, et al. “Patriarchal Structures in Shakespeare's Drama.” Shakespeare Quarterly, vol. 37, no. 1, 1986, p. 128., doi:10.2307/2870206.
5: Morgenroth, Thekla, and Michelle K. Ryan. “Gender Trouble in Social Psychology: How Can
Butler’s Work Inform Experimental Social Psychologists’ Conceptualization of Gender?” Frontiers in Psychology, vol. 9, 2018, doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2018.01320.
6: Greenfield, Matthew. “Fragments of Nationalism in Troilus and Cressida.” Shakespeare’S Problem Plays, 2005, pp. 199–222., doi:10.1007/978-1-137-20890-3_11.
7: Vaughan, Virginia Mason. “Daughters of the Game: Troilus and Cressida and the Sexual Discourse of 16th-Century England.” Women's Studies International Forum, vol. 13, no. 3, 1990, pp. 209–220., doi:10.1016/0277-5395(90)90006-j.
8: O'Rourke, James, and Barbara E. Bowen. “Gender in the Theater of War: Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida.” Shakespeare Quarterly, vol. 47, no. 1, 1996, p. 89., doi:10.2307/2871065.
9: Dunmore, Simon. “Troílus and Cressída.” More Alternative Shakespeare Auditions for Women, 2018, pp. 98–99., doi:10.4324/9781315059747-43.
10: Gregory.Leonard. “Assuming Gender in Hamlet and Troilus and Cressida: ʻAre We to Assume That There Were Women in the Audience.” Multicultural Shakespeare, vol. 11, no. 26, 2014, doi:10.2478/mopa-2014-0006.
11: Clark, Timothy. The Cambridge Introduction to Literature and the Environment. Cambridge:
Cambridge UP, 2011. 111-119. Print.
12: Martin, Randall. “Shakespeare and Ecology: Definitions and Introduc- tion.” UNB. Fredericton. 8 Sept. 2011. Lecture.
13: Rosenfield, Kirstie Gulick. “Nursing Nothing: Witchcraft and Female Sex- uality in The Winter's Tale.” Mosaic 35.1 (2002). N. pag. Literature Online. Web. 12 Dec. 2011.
14: Sandilands, Catriona. The Good-Natured Feminist: Ecofeminism and the Quest for Democracy. Minneapolis: U of Minnesota P, 1999. UNB Libraries. Web. 11 Dec. 2011. 15: Shakespeare, William. Anthony and Cleopatra. Ed. Michael Neill. Oxford: Oxford UP,
2008. Print. Oxford World’s Classics.
16: Cymbeline. Ed. J. M. Nosworthy. Cambridge: Harvard UP, 1964. Print. The Arden Shakespeare.
17: Hamlet. Ed. G.R. Hibbard. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2008. Print. Oxford World’s Classics.
Published
2023-12-10
How to Cite
Zulfiqar, S. (2023). THE "UNTASTED NECTOR" OF MUTED ECOLOGY: AN ECOFEMINIST ANALYSIS OF TROILUS AND CRESSIDA: THE "UNTASTED NECTOR" OF MUTED ECOLOGY: AN ECOFEMINIST ANALYSIS OF TROILUS AND CRESSIDA. International Bulletin of Linguistics and Literature (IBLL), 6(4), 1-14. Retrieved from http://ibll.com.pk/index.php/ibll/article/view/172